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2nd Workshop on
Modularity In Systems Software
(MISS 2012)

March 27
Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam (Germany)
co-located with AOSD.12

Call for Papers


Important Dates
Deadline Papers: December 23, 2011
23:59 (Apia time)
Notification of acceptance: January 13, 2012
Final papers due : February 25, 2012
9:00 (NY time)
Workshop: March 27, 2012

 

Overview

Systems software, comprising artifacts ranging from middleware servers over virtual machines and operating systems to hardware descriptions, typically bears great inherent complexity. This brings about intricate relationships between logical modules of such systems that are seldom clearly expressed in source code or architecture descriptions. As more and more features and requirements are being “pushed down” into the infrastructure, the developers of systems software need better tools and techniques for dealing with the ensuing increased complexity. The design and implementation of systems-level software presents unique opportunities and challenges for research on software modularity. These challenges include the need to address the inherent complexity of infrastructure software, the need for strong assurances of correct and predictable behavior, the need for maximum run-time performance, and the necessity of dealing with the large body of existing systems software components.

This workshop aims to provide a highly interactive forum for researchers and developers to discuss the application of and relationships between exciting new modularity constructs for systems software such as aspects, components, traits and context layers. The goal is to put these constructs into a common reference frame and to build connections between the software engineering and systems communities.

Following up on last year's workshop, MISS 2012 puts special focus on the challenges in system's programming introduced by multi-core platforms. As hardware-supported parallelization becomes mainstream, there is an increasing pressure on systems infrastructure to exploit this new parallelism to its fullest. However, the non-modular nature of parallel execution, and the numerous levels at which parallelism can be achieved (application, systems infrastructure, hardware or even a combination) make it hard to come up with an intuitive, yet efficient parallel architecture. We solicit novel ideas and experience reports on this emerging research area.

Other suggested topics for position papers include, but are not restricted to:

  • Approaches that combine or relate techniques based on advanced modularization concepts
  • Dimensions of infrastructure software quality including comprehensibility, configurability (by implementers), customizability (by users), reliability, evolvability, scalability, and run-time characteristics such as performance and code size
  • Merits and downsides of container-, ORB-, and system-based separation of concerns
  • Architectural techniques for particular system concerns, e.g., security, static and dynamic optimization, and real-time behavior
  • Design patterns for systems software
  • “Mining” and refactoring of concerns in systems code
  • Application- or domain-specific optimization of systems
  • Reasoning and optimization across architectural layers
  • Quantitative and qualitative evaluation

Agenda

The workshop will be structured to encourage fruitful discussions and build connections between workshop participants. To this end, approximately half of the workshop time will be devoted to short presentations of accepted papers, with the remaining half devoted to semi-structured discussion groups and lightning talks. The latter are short talks that are combined with tool demos, aimed at stimulating even more interaction between workshop attendees. Participants will be expected to have read the accepted papers prior to the workshop, to help ensure focused discussions.

Submission Guidelines

Invitation to the workshop will be based on accepted position papers, 3-5 pages in length. All papers must be submitted as PDF documents in ACM format sigplanconf through the MISS 2011 online submission found at: http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=miss12. Paper submissions will be reviewed by the workshop program committee and by designated reviewers. Papers will be evaluated based on technical quality, originality, relevance, and presentation.

In addition to position papers, we also solicit proposals for lightning talks, i.e., a combination of a 5 minute talk and 5 minute tool demo. Prospective lightning presenters should send us an abstract of 250 words (deadline: March 13, 2011). Abstracts will NOT be published, they are intended to be read by the reviewers only (hence the late deadline).

Comments and questions can be sent to this email address.

Publication of Papers

All accepted papers will be posted at the workshop web site prior to the workshop date, to give all participants the opportunity to read them before the workshop. In addition, the accepted position papers will be published in a Workshop Proceedings in the ACM Digital Library.

Program Committee

Organizing Committee

Steering Committee